Shutter Shock: Diving Deep into 'Snapshot' 1979
A Dingo Ate My Movie!January 25, 2024x
36
01:09:2747.73 MB

Shutter Shock: Diving Deep into 'Snapshot' 1979

This week on "A Dingo Ate My Movie," we're diving into the sultry and suspenseful world of "Snapshot," a 1979 Australian cult classic. Directed by Simon Wincer, this film, also known as "The Day After Halloween," is a hidden gem of Aussie cinema that blends thriller and drama in a unique narrative.

Join us as we explore the story of Angela, a hairdresser turned model who finds herself in the crosshairs of an intense and eerie stalker. "Snapshot" is a snapshot of the '70s itself, with its distinct style, music, and a vibe that can only be described as quintessentially Australian. We'll dissect the compelling performances, the atmospheric cinematography, and how this movie reflects the societal and cultural nuances of its time.

We've got some juicy behind-the-scenes stories and insights into the film's reception then and now. Whether you're a long-time fan or new to Australian cult cinema, this episode will ignite a love for the unique flair of Aussie filmmaking. So, grab your popcorn and settle in for a thrilling ride through the streets of 1970s Melbourne!

Remember, you can stream the episode on all major podcast platforms. Don't forget to subscribe for more deep dives into the quirky, the underrated, and the outright bizarre in Australian film history.

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Please note that this podcast often explores topics and uses language from past eras. This means that some of the discussions may include attitudes, expressions, and viewpoints that were common in those times but may not align with the standards and expectations of our society today. We'd like to ask for your understanding as we navigate these historical contexts, which are important to appreciate the era we're discussing fully.